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Van play today

He was in street clothes yesterday. Any news if he'll be ready to play vs. the Putty Tats?
griz_v_weber_11162013_045.jpg
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rogermp said:
He was in street clothes yesterday. Any news if he'll be ready to play vs. the Putty Tats?
griz_v_weber_11162013_045.jpg
[/url]

I watched the game on TV. Prior to the start of the game, a chain gang guy could be lip read as saying to Van, "Are you going to play next week." Van was facing away from the camera, but the chain gang guy smiled at his reply and gave him a tumbs up. Draw your own conclusions.
 
cannonball said:
rogermp said:
He was in street clothes yesterday. Any news if he'll be ready to play vs. the Putty Tats?
griz_v_weber_11162013_045.jpg
[/url]

I watched the game on TV. Prior to the start of the game, a chain gang guy could be lip read as saying to Van, "Are you going to play next week." Van was facing away from the camera, but the chain gang guy smiled at his reply and gave him a tumbs up. Draw your own conclusions.


I saw that as well.....
 
Well, I guess I learned something today....The word originates from the Middle East and is Arabic: Mufti (مفتي) means an Islamic scholar who is an interpreter or expounder of Islamic law (Sharia), and is the active form of the Arabic afta, meaning "to judge". It has been used by the British army since 1816 and is thought to derive from the vaguely Eastern style dressing gowns and tasseled caps worn by off-duty officers in the early 19th century. Yule and Burnell's Hobson-Jobson: A Glossary of Colloquial Anglo-Indian Words and Phrases, and of Kindred Terms, Etymological, Historical, Geographical and Discursive (1886) notes that the word was "perhaps originally applied to the attire of dressing-gown, smoking-cap, and slippers, which was like the Oriental dress of the Mufti".[
 
signedbewildered said:
Well, I guess I learned something today....The word originates from the Middle East and is Arabic: Mufti (مفتي) means an Islamic scholar who is an interpreter or expounder of Islamic law (Sharia), and is the active form of the Arabic afta, meaning "to judge". It has been used by the British army since 1816 and is thought to derive from the vaguely Eastern style dressing gowns and tasseled caps worn by off-duty officers in the early 19th century. Yule and Burnell's Hobson-Jobson: A Glossary of Colloquial Anglo-Indian Words and Phrases, and of Kindred Terms, Etymological, Historical, Geographical and Discursive (1886) notes that the word was "perhaps originally applied to the attire of dressing-gown, smoking-cap, and slippers, which was like the Oriental dress of the Mufti".[
Thanks, I'll certainly sleep better tonight knowing that :thumb:
 
Bear Axed said:
signedbewildered said:
Well, I guess I learned something today....The word originates from the Middle East and is Arabic: Mufti (مفتي) means an Islamic scholar who is an interpreter or expounder of Islamic law (Sharia), and is the active form of the Arabic afta, meaning "to judge". It has been used by the British army since 1816 and is thought to derive from the vaguely Eastern style dressing gowns and tasseled caps worn by off-duty officers in the early 19th century. Yule and Burnell's Hobson-Jobson: A Glossary of Colloquial Anglo-Indian Words and Phrases, and of Kindred Terms, Etymological, Historical, Geographical and Discursive (1886) notes that the word was "perhaps originally applied to the attire of dressing-gown, smoking-cap, and slippers, which was like the Oriental dress of the Mufti".[
Thanks, I'll certainly sleep better tonight knowing that :thumb:

Term is also common at private schools where school uniforms are required. When talking about schools where uniforms are not required, the term mufti is used for those schools where the students don't dress in uniforms. For example, "Look there, she's dressed in mufti today".
 
Mufti, or civies/civvies (slang for "civilian attire"),[1] refers to ordinary clothes, especially when worn by one who normally wears, or has long worn, a military or other uniform.
 
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