• Hi Guest, want to participate in the discussions, keep track of read/unread posts and more? Create your free account and increase the benefits of your eGriz.com experience today!

SRS will not be used in 2013

HookedonGriz

Well-known member
DONOR
A good read as there has been plenty of discussion on SRS and what it means.....



FCS notebook: SRS going through trial run this season
Chris Lang Follow Chris Lang on Twitter: @ChrisLangLNAPosted2 months ago

Consider the 2013 season a test period for the Simple Rating System (SRS).


In June, the Division I Football Championship Committee added the SRS to the list of factors to be considered when looking at potential at-large teams for the Football Championship Subdivision playoffs. Though the vote to add the SRS went through during the summer, the selection committee for the 24-team tournament is still tweaking a number of factors, which is why the SRS is sort of in beta mode this season.

“We want to make sure it’s right before we go into it and all of a sudden there’s all these issues that come out of it,” Northern Iowa athletics director Troy Dannen — a committee member — told the Argus Leader of Sioux Falls, S.D. “Basically, if we pick the wrong teams, it’s going to lose credibility.”

The hope is for the SRS to be similar to the RPI used by the NCAA for both basketball and baseball tournament selections. There’s one big difference, though between the SRS and the RPI — Division II victories will be taken into consideration, and not simply ignored as non-factors as has been the case in the past.

Because there are plenty of ratings that measure the strength of Division II and Division III programs — the Massey Index and Sagarin come to mind — there will be a way to differentiate between playing a high-level DII like fifth-ranked Colorado State-Pueblo, which beat FCS Northern Colorado, and a low-level DII like Kentucky Wesleyan, which plays Liberty at the end of September.

Beginning this season, thanks in part to the expansion from 20 to 24 teams, the committee will strongly consider teams with six Division I victories. The past threshold was generally seven DI wins.

Why is this all so important? Much of it has to do with scheduling challenges teams in the Midwest and West face. Eastern Washington’s schedule, for instance, features two FBS opponents, one DII and one FCS non-conference foe. Southern Utah has two FBS teams, a DII and will play league foe Sacramento State in a non-conference game to fill out its schedule.

“To be able to get credit for difficult scheduling, having to play a quality Division II school and the FBS, that balances out a little bit the fact we can’t get a game with Valparaiso, Butler or Saint Francis or Drake or people like this,” Central Arkansas coach Clint Conque told The Sports Network. “And I think also, too, because they have this rating system in place, it creates a more objective opinion instead of backroom lawyering that potentially could go on with at-large selection opportunities. I’m not suggesting that goes on. What I am saying, though, it that it does create a more objective, black and white tool for the committee to use versus more subjective material.”
 
I didn't see anything saying the SRS would not be used. Just looked like it would not be fully instituted this year.

This an interesting quote in the article:

"Beginning this season, thanks in part to the expansion from 20 to 24 teams, the committee will strongly consider teams with six Division I victories. The past threshold was generally seven DI wins."
 
PlayerRep said:
I didn't see anything saying the SRS would not be used. Just looked like it would not be fully instituted this year.

This an interesting quote in the article:

"Beginning this season, thanks in part to the expansion from 20 to 24 teams, the committee will strongly consider teams with six Division I victories. The past threshold was generally seven DI wins."

Yes I found that part interesting as well. They'll look at SRS just to see if it is a viable predictor for next year but its not being utilized this year. Even when it is used its typically to figure out the last one or two teams in....to make it more objective instead of subjective.
 
PlayerRep said:
I didn't see anything saying the SRS would not be used. Just looked like it would not be fully instituted this year.

This an interesting quote in the article:

"Beginning this season, thanks in part to the expansion from 20 to 24 teams, the committee will strongly consider teams with six Division I victories. The past threshold was generally seven DI wins."

Villanova and Southern Illinois just had their playoff hopes revived...

Which is why I have an issue with the SRS. It currently has Delaware ranked 6th in FCS because they lost close games on the road (where you get a 3 point shift) and then they blew out teams at home. It is less about your record, and more about your margin of victory. If the SRS becomes a legitimate factor in FCS Playoff selections, teams will be smart to run up the score as much as possible.
 
Seems like this thread would be a good place to add this, rather than starting a new one. By a (somewhat) odd scheduling coincidence, the eight top teams in the CAA play each other this coming weekend:

  • Maine (10-1) at UNH (6-4)
    Towson (9-2) vs JMU (6-5)
    Delaware (7-4) vs* Villanova (5-5)
    W&M (7-4) at Richmond (5-6)
(Rhode Island is done and conference #9 Stony Brook plays #11 Albany.)
* “game at “neutral” site (Chester, PA) -- called the "Battle of the Blue."

If the teams with the better records all win, the CAA final standings will be

  • Maine (11-1)
    Towson (10-2)
    Delaware (8-4)
    W&M (8-4)
    UNH (6-5)
    JMU (6-6)
    Villanova (5-6)
    Richmond (5-7)

Anybody care to wager on the odds that New Hampshire gets a bid if these are the results? Basically, only if New Hampshire pulls off an upset of Maine -- and UNH is tough at home -- will the CAA have five teams with a sniff at a bid. You think the Big Sky is a potential mess?

With two key “upsets” (vs Delaware and W&M) you might get

  • Maine (12-1)
    Towson (10-2)
    Delaware (7-5)
    W&M (7-5)
    UNH (6-5)
    Villanova (6-5)
    JMU (6-6)
    Richmond (6-6)

So, in a kind of “worse case,” the CAA could find itself with only two bids. (Not saying it will happen ... but it could.)
 
Back
Top