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SI Investigation of OK St - Trouble

PlayerRep

Well-known member
"Sports Illustrated, in a news release sent Monday, gave highlights of the five-part series that will begin Tuesday with a posting on SI.com. The magazine says it conducted interviews with more than 60 former Oklahoma State players who played for the school from 2001-10.

Among the allegations of misconduct and potential NCAA violations are:

— An Oklahoma State assistant coach paid cash bonuses to players of up to $500 for performance.

— Oklahoma State boosters and at least two assistant coaches funneled money to players and provided sham jobs for which players were paid.

— Tutors and other school personnel completed school work for players and professors gave passing grades for little or no work.

— The program's drug policy was selectively enforced, allowing some star players to go unpunished for repeated positive tests.

— Some members of a hostess program used by the football coaching staff during the recruitment of players had sex with recruits."

http://news.yahoo.com/okla-st-ad-apologizes-big-12-schools-230627118--spt.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
 
What will come out about DEZ Bryant? Cannot stand that guy.

In the old days, sex was set up players introducing the recruits to girls.

It sure sounds like they have one stupid coaching staff. I can see doing a few things to try helping your program, but this many things? Doing any of that crap is just stupid. How will the NCAA handle this coming from a BCS program?
 
mtgrizrule said:
How will the NCAA handle this coming from a BCS program?

Don't worry 'bout it. Five minutes after they dick something they turn 'round and call it a slut and a whore anyways.
 
New info on this topic:
http://m.espn.go.com/ncf/story?storyId=9657658&src=desktop" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

At least eight former Oklahoma State football players say they received cash payments from people associated with the Cowboys program starting in the Les Miles era and identified another 29 players as having also taken money, Sports Illustrated revealed Tuesday in the first of a five-part investigative series on the football program.

Some players received $2,000 annually and others around $10,000, multiple players told SI, with a few stars allegedly received $25,000 or more.

Among the players SI identified as having taken money, included former quarterback Josh Fields, running back Tatum Bell and cornerback Darrent Williams, who was shot to death in 2007 while a member of the Denver Broncos. Fields, Bell and others denied getting illicit payments, but multiple players were on the record as saying they received money and saw other players getting payments.

SI also claimed that former quarterback Bobby Reid was given money. During a notable September 2007 press conference, Gundy staunchly defended Reid after an Oklahoman columnist questioned Reid's maturity. But four former Cowboys told SI that after Reid lost his starting job, he stopped receiving bonus money. Reid too denied receiving money while a player.

Subsequent chapters of the investigative piece allege that there was also widespread academic misconduct involving the football program, that the program tolerated recreational drug use and that members of a hostess program had sex with recruits.

The first part of the series concentrated on financial irregularities in the football program. SI reported that payments to players, which stretched from 2001 to at least '11 under head coaches Miles and Mike Gundy, were primarily delivered three ways: a de facto bonus system based on performances on the field; direct payments to players from boosters and coaches independent of performance; and no-show and sham jobs -- including work related to the renovation of Boone Pickens Stadium -- that involved at least one assistant coach and several boosters.

Several players claimed that former Oklahoma State special teams and secondary coach Joe DeForest played an integral role in the bonus payment system and would determine how much players would get.

"It was just like in life when you work," said Thomas Wright, a defensive back from 2002-04. "The better the job you do, the more money you make."

Defensive back Calvin Mickens said he received $200 after forcing a fumble and breaking up a pass in his very first game.

"I was like, Wow, this is the life!" Mickens said, according to Sports Illustrated. "I'm 18, playing football, and I just got $200."

DeForest, now the associate head coach and special teams coordinator at West Virginia, said he never paid a player for on-field performance.

T. Boone Pickens, the school's most prominent booster, was not implicated in any improprieties by SI's sources.

The SI report claims that the timing of the violations coincided with Miles' arrival at Oklahoma State in 2000. The Cowboys had gone 3-8 the year before Miles became coach, but afterward the football budget was increased. Assistants were paid more, players ate better, facilities were upgraded, but, according to players SI interviewed, the culture change around the football program also included NCAA violations.

"It's very disconcerting to hear about all these things that are alleged to have happened," athletic director Mike Holder said last week when SI presented him with its findings. "But there's nothing more important to us than playing by the rules, being ethical, having integrity. To hear we have some shortcomings or could have ... in a way I guess I should thank you. Because our intent is to take this information and to investigate and do something about it."

Gundy, trying to focus on preparing the No. 13 Cowboys for their home opener on Saturday against Lamar, said he was confident the proper steps would be taken by the university.

"I'm going to guess that once we get all the information and we see what's out there, then our administration, our people inside, will look at it and we'll see where we made mistakes," Gundy said. "And we'll try to make ourselves better and we'll correct it and then we'll move forward. And I would hope that there will be some of it that we'll say, 'I'm not sure, it could go one way or the other.' That's really the best way I can put it. But I think the university is looking forward to seeing the information and seeing how we can make ourselves better from it."

West Virginia released a statement Saturday that did not mention DeForest and said it had "launched an internal review to ensure the coach's full compliance to NCAA rules while at West Virginia," while also contacting the NCAA.

"While our assistant football coach has denied the allegations, it is the right thing to do to look into the matter and review practices here," athletic director Oliver Luck said.

Miles has said he didn't know of any improprieties while he was the Oklahoma State coach.

"I can tell you this: We have always done things right," he said after LSU's game Saturday night in Baton Rouge, La.
 
NLGrizFan said:
New info on this topic:
http://m.espn.go.com/ncf/story?storyId=9657658&src=desktop" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

At least eight former Oklahoma State football players say they received cash payments from people associated with the Cowboys program starting in the Les Miles era and identified another 29 players as having also taken money, Sports Illustrated revealed Tuesday in the first of a five-part investigative series on the football program.

Some players received $2,000 annually and others around $10,000, multiple players told SI, with a few stars allegedly received $25,000 or more.

Among the players SI identified as having taken money, included former quarterback Josh Fields, running back Tatum Bell and cornerback Darrent Williams, who was shot to death in 2007 while a member of the Denver Broncos. Fields, Bell and others denied getting illicit payments, but multiple players were on the record as saying they received money and saw other players getting payments.

SI also claimed that former quarterback Bobby Reid was given money. During a notable September 2007 press conference, Gundy staunchly defended Reid after an Oklahoman columnist questioned Reid's maturity. But four former Cowboys told SI that after Reid lost his starting job, he stopped receiving bonus money. Reid too denied receiving money while a player.

Subsequent chapters of the investigative piece allege that there was also widespread academic misconduct involving the football program, that the program tolerated recreational drug use and that members of a hostess program had sex with recruits.

The first part of the series concentrated on financial irregularities in the football program. SI reported that payments to players, which stretched from 2001 to at least '11 under head coaches Miles and Mike Gundy, were primarily delivered three ways: a de facto bonus system based on performances on the field; direct payments to players from boosters and coaches independent of performance; and no-show and sham jobs -- including work related to the renovation of Boone Pickens Stadium -- that involved at least one assistant coach and several boosters.

Several players claimed that former Oklahoma State special teams and secondary coach Joe DeForest played an integral role in the bonus payment system and would determine how much players would get.

"It was just like in life when you work," said Thomas Wright, a defensive back from 2002-04. "The better the job you do, the more money you make."

Defensive back Calvin Mickens said he received $200 after forcing a fumble and breaking up a pass in his very first game.

"I was like, Wow, this is the life!" Mickens said, according to Sports Illustrated. "I'm 18, playing football, and I just got $200."

DeForest, now the associate head coach and special teams coordinator at West Virginia, said he never paid a player for on-field performance.

T. Boone Pickens, the school's most prominent booster, was not implicated in any improprieties by SI's sources.

The SI report claims that the timing of the violations coincided with Miles' arrival at Oklahoma State in 2000. The Cowboys had gone 3-8 the year before Miles became coach, but afterward the football budget was increased. Assistants were paid more, players ate better, facilities were upgraded, but, according to players SI interviewed, the culture change around the football program also included NCAA violations.

"It's very disconcerting to hear about all these things that are alleged to have happened," athletic director Mike Holder said last week when SI presented him with its findings. "But there's nothing more important to us than playing by the rules, being ethical, having integrity. To hear we have some shortcomings or could have ... in a way I guess I should thank you. Because our intent is to take this information and to investigate and do something about it."

Gundy, trying to focus on preparing the No. 13 Cowboys for their home opener on Saturday against Lamar, said he was confident the proper steps would be taken by the university.

"I'm going to guess that once we get all the information and we see what's out there, then our administration, our people inside, will look at it and we'll see where we made mistakes," Gundy said. "And we'll try to make ourselves better and we'll correct it and then we'll move forward. And I would hope that there will be some of it that we'll say, 'I'm not sure, it could go one way or the other.' That's really the best way I can put it. But I think the university is looking forward to seeing the information and seeing how we can make ourselves better from it."

West Virginia released a statement Saturday that did not mention DeForest and said it had "launched an internal review to ensure the coach's full compliance to NCAA rules while at West Virginia," while also contacting the NCAA.

"While our assistant football coach has denied the allegations, it is the right thing to do to look into the matter and review practices here," athletic director Oliver Luck said.

Miles has said he didn't know of any improprieties while he was the Oklahoma State coach.

"I can tell you this: We have always done things right," he said after LSU's game Saturday night in Baton Rouge, La.

Some of these things occur at many of the bigger and better FBS programs. It's not uncommon. Perhaps more systematic at OK St. Hum, Miles is now at LSU. Why would former players reveal this type of info to SI? Seems like they would want to protect their alma mater.
 
Did any of them receive left over hamburgers or brats after a game?
I need to know just how deep this pit is!
:ugeek:
 
Maybe they finally realized how wrong it was? Maybe their coach said something that pi$$ed them off? Maybe self conscious? Who knows? It's kinda interesting tho.
 
Grizzlies1982 said:
Did any of them receive left over hamburgers or brats after a game?
I need to know just how deep this pit is!
:ugeek:
I think it'll be interesting to see how this plays out consisting what UM just went thru. Probably not so interesting to others tho... Honestly I don't care about these bigger schools but like I was sayin, I find it kinda interesting. Who does this stuff??
 
Grizzlies1982 said:
Did any of them receive left over hamburgers or brats after a game?
I need to know just how deep this pit is!
:ugeek:

Did any of them get the benefit of a one week loan for $320? Hopefully, a photo listing of the hostesses will become public.
 
PlayerRep said:
Grizzlies1982 said:
Did any of them receive left over hamburgers or brats after a game?
I need to know just how deep this pit is!
:ugeek:

Did any of them get the benefit of a one week loan for $320?
Hopefully, a photo listing of the hostesses will become public.

Excellent point. We need to determine just how beneficial these benefits were. :ugeek:
 
Silvertip said:
Ol' T Boone Pickens has probably already ponied up mega $$$$$ for a legal defense fund...

[tweet]https://twitter.com/DanWolken/status/377453603084320768[/tweet]
 
SI Article: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/college-football/news/20130910/oklahoma-state-part-1-money/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
 
Breaking news, T Boone Pickens let Brandon Weeden use his washer and dryer once! DEATH PENALTY
 
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