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NCAA Violation?

Thank God the NCAA is there to prevent serious abuses like this and ensure a level playing field.


What a joke that organization is.
 
MrTitleist said:
The NCAA is so mad at Miami they're going to punish Portland's golf team $20.

Enjoyed the paraphrasing of Jerry Tarkanian's famous quote...one that very accurately describes the NCAA.
 
Paterno family going after ncaa with large lawsuit.

http://sports.yahoo.com/news/ncaaf--paterno-family-vs--ncaa-lawsuit-illustrates-happy-valley-divide-is-still-very-real-005344142.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
 
Student athletes better start to buy their own drinking water and carry a bucket of water from home to flush the toilet. Better yet, they had better just go to their own room/home for that purpose. That would prevent them from stealing University resources for their own petty needs. If you don't jump on this hard, before you know it they'll be using the light from the university's property to find their way at night. I shudder to think of the abuses that would result.
 
The NCAA, back in the days when the AAU ran everything, stood up for the athletes and ultimately broke the power of the AAU, ostensibly in favor of protecting the athletes from bureaucratic abuse and overreach.

Like the fate of all revolutions, the revolutionaries have now become the bureaucrats, as thoroughly as oppressive and arbitrary as those they replaced.

Notably, "bureaucracy is the epoxy that greases the wheels of progress." -- James H. Boren, "When in Doubt, Mumble : A Bureaucrat’s Handbook" (1972).

Maybe it is time for the NCAA to go.
 
UMGriz75 said:
The NCAA, back in the days when the AAU ran everything, stood up for the athletes and ultimately broke the power of the AAU, ostensibly in favor of protecting the athletes from bureaucratic abuse and overreach.

Like the fate of all revolutions, the revolutionaries have now become the bureaucrats, as thoroughly as oppressive and arbitrary as those they replaced.

Notably, "bureaucracy is the epoxy that greases the wheels of progress." -- James H. Boren, "When in Doubt, Mumble : A Bureaucrat’s Handbook" (1972).

Maybe it is time for the NCAA to go.
Perhaps a "Sunshine Law" -- expiration dates for a law/rule -- could save it. Here's an interesting take on the problem http://www.businesspsych.org/articles/215.html
James Larsen said:
Business Practice Findings …
Max Weber [guru of modern management theory] is generally credited with being the first to seriously study rule-making in modern organizations, and frankly, he didn't think too much of it. He believed that the natural result of rational administration was a process of rule-making that relentlessly produced rules "until the last ton of fossilized coal is burned." And he believed these growing networks of rules would eventually form an "iron cage" which would “enslave us all.” Modern bureaucracies are “a rule-generation process turned loose,” he said.
… Max Weber is not the only person to try to understand rule-making. Many others have advanced their own ideas, and Martin Schulz, from the University of Washington, is familiar with them. … Schulz realized that over time, new, unique problems would become less frequent, and this implies a slowing of new rules. [Which he proved to be the case.] … Another process retards the creation of new rules by stretching old rules to apply to new problems. Unfortunately, these old rules were created in response to other problems and Schulz believes it is unlikely these old rules offer the best response to new problems. … Schulz recommends wholesale abandonment of rules. To be sure, problems will immediately arise when we do this, and new rules will quickly fill the need, but he believes this is a healthy process.
The basic problem with the NCAA -- like every bureaucracy I ever observed -- is the essentially mindless application of "old" rules to something, whether they make sense for the specific situation or not. A sort of "reductio ad absurdum" in action.

Sadly, only an handful of entrenched, non-business bureaucracies have ever been over-turned, except by an actual, bone-fide revolution.

Competition -- between businesses or (more dangerously) governments -- is the only proven thing that will force change on a large, bureaucratic organization. FWIW: That's why really large businesses try to "get in bed with" government -- they want the government to impose rules that make it more difficult (preferably impossible) for competitors to even get started.

Getting back to the forum subject: Does anyone really think the big "BCS" football programs would favor rules changes that might threaten their domination of the college game? The "laws of bureaucracy" say no, of course not. The NCAA is just another large bureaucracy ... I am not hopeful about construction change.

(Sorry for the dissertation, but I think it's pertinent here.)
 
EverettGriz said:
CatzWillRise said:
And yet this somehow isn't moved to the sports forum...


:cry: :cry:

Oh, not crying. Simply questioning the logic of:

Moving a thread about a conference foe's recruit from a forum that specifically says "... and the FCS" to a general sports forum,

While keeping a thread about NCAA "sanctions" against a U of Portland women's golf player, in a football forum.

Then again, it's eGriz. I try to leave my left brain at the door when I enter.
 
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