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Honoring All Who Served

In the time honored eGriz tradition, to keep to topic, this being the 80th Anniversary of D-Day Normandy, my two cents worth. My dad was one of FIVE BROTHERS who served in WWII. Years later, I recall seeing a flag-like window ornament which was hung in the windows of the parents homes of parents who had their kids in the military at the time. Five gold stars on a field of blue(as I recall).
It was, supposedly, common to have one or two stars hanging in the window. But FIVE? Years later I recalled that banner. Where it went, I don't know. All five made it home, alive and physically well.
Helmets, medals, uniforms brought home, were used by us younger ones to 'play War' in the later ',50's and '60's. But, NEVER, EVER did we hear stories, war stories, from parents or uncles who lived it. It just wasn't done. Something to be forgotten, not worn like a medal on your shirt, or bragged about. The experience was from Northern Africa, Europe, and Pacific. Visit your local cemetery's military section and read the headstones, and reflect on their experiences/sacrifices, and thank God for what you have today.
 
In the time honored eGriz tradition, to keep to topic, this being the 80th Anniversary of D-Day Normandy, my two cents worth. My dad was one of FIVE BROTHERS who served in WWII. Years later, I recall seeing a flag-like window ornament which was hung in the windows of the parents homes of parents who had their kids in the military at the time. Five gold stars on a field of blue(as I recall).
It was, supposedly, common to have one or two stars hanging in the window. But FIVE? Years later I recalled that banner. Where it went, I don't know. All five made it home, alive and physically well.
Helmets, medals, uniforms brought home, were used by us younger ones to 'play War' in the later ',50's and '60's. But, NEVER, EVER did we hear stories, war stories, from parents or uncles who lived it. It just wasn't done. Something to be forgotten, not worn like a medal on your shirt, or bragged about. The experience was from Northern Africa, Europe, and Pacific. Visit your local cemetery's military section and read the headstones, and reflect on their experiences/sacrifices, and thank God for what you have today.
Good post - thanks. 5 kids serving is a heck of a sacrifice. God bless your grandparents.

The flag you saw probably had 5 blue stars. If you see one of those flags with a yellow star(s), it represents a serving family member who was killed in action.

Hence the terms "Gold Star Mom" "Gold Star Spouse" etc.
 
Good post - thanks. 5 kids serving is a heck of a sacrifice. God bless your grandparents.

The flag you saw probably had 5 blue stars. If you see one of those flags with a yellow star(s), it represents a serving family member who was killed in action.

Hence the terms "Gold Star Mom" "Gold Star Spouse" etc.
Thanks for the correction/education on the stars flag. Indeed, all five made it home in one piece. Didn't know about the KIA stars. The flag disappeared after my grandfather's death. Eight kid in total, so, seven suspects.
 
A Journal op-ed on Reagan's D-Day speech at Pointe du Hoc 40 years ago by Peggy Noonan.

"The speech was a plain-faced one. It was about what it was about, the valor shown 40 years before by the young men of Operation Overlord who, by taking the Normandy beaches, seized back the Continent of Europe.

But there was a speech within the speech, and that had to do with more-current struggles.

Reagan wished to laud the reunited U.S. Rangers before him, so he simply described what they’d done: “At dawn, on the morning of the 6th of June, 1944, 225 Rangers jumped off the British landing craft and ran to the bottom of these cliffs.” Their mission was one of the hardest of the invasion, to climb the cliffs to take out enemy guns.

“And the American Rangers began to climb.” They shot rope ladders, pulled themselves up. “When one Ranger fell, another would take his place.” Two hundred twenty five Rangers had come there. “After two days of fighting, only 90 could still bear arms.”


“Behind me is a memorial that symbolizes the Ranger daggers that were thrust into the top of these cliffs. And before me are the men who put them there. These are the boys of Pointe du Hoc. These are the men who took the cliffs.”

The “boys,” in the front rows, began to weep. They had never in 40 years been spoken of in that way, their achievement described by an American president, who told all the world what they’d done.
Nancy Reagan and others, as they looked at them, were moved, and their eyes filled. Reagan couldn’t show what he was feeling, he had to continue. But afterward, in the Oval Office, he told me of an old Ranger who, before the ceremony, saw some young U.S. Rangers re-enacting the climb, and the old vet joined in and made it to the top. Reagan’s eyes shined: “Boy, that was something.”

The speech within the speech was about the crisis going on as Reagan spoke. The Western alliance was falling apart. Its political leaders were under severe pressure at home. British, West German and Italian peace movements had risen and gained influence in 1982 and 1983, pushing to stop the U.S.-Soviet arms race. The Soviets had placed SS-20 missiles in Eastern Europe. In response, in late 1983, the U.S. put Pershing II and cruise missiles in Western Europe. Arms talks continued but went nowhere, and the Soviets often walked out. In New York, a million antinuclear protesters had marched from Central Park to the United Nations. In Bonn, hundreds of thousands protesters took to the streets in what police called the largest demonstration since the end of the war.

It was one of the tensest moments of the Cold War.

Reagan hated nuclear weapons but believed progress couldn’t be wrung from the Russians with words and pleas. More was needed, a show of determination.

He understood the pressure the political leaders of the West were under, and at Pointe du Hoc he was telling them, between the lines: Hold firm and we will succeed.

That’s why he spoke at such length of all the Allied armies at D-Day, not only the Americans. It’s why he paid tribute to those armies’ valor—to remind current leaders what their ancestors had done. It’s why he talked about “the unity of the Allies.” “They rebuilt a new Europe together.”

He was saying: I know the pressure you’re under for backing me, but hold on. They pretty much did. And in the end the decisions of 1983 and ’84 led to the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, signed in 1987 by Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev, a turning point in the Cold War.

If you hear that speech, be moved by the Rangers who climbed those cliffs and the country that sent them there. Care that Ronald Reagan became the first public person to capture and laud the greatest generation, but delicately, because it was his generation and he couldn’t self-valorize. (Yes, a sweeter time.) But he was telling the young: That guy you call grandpa, see him in a new way. See his whole generation for who they were.

And hear, too, a message that echoes down the generations: Good people with a great cause must stand together, grab that rope and climb, no matter what fire."
 
You started it. You called me a tool because I asked a question f someone else.

One doesn’t have to have been in the military to understand and support the military. My experience and heritage with the military is significant.

How many Purple Hearts did you do you it your family have. Mine has at least 3.

You are the tool. Great for your service, but that doesn’t give you the right to be a jerk and not get a response.
The man messed up saying to"...renumber all who have given the ultimate sacrifice to protect our freedom".

You respond with, "What number are you going to give them?"

Yeah, I called you a tool for that. I'd say it to your face if I still lived in Montana. I'm not a chicken sh*t keyboard warrior.

You really don't want to have the penis measuring contest regarding family in the military. I don't have to prove a damn thing to you but if I did, I have a medal count of 2silver stars, 1 distinguished service cross, 13 bronze stars, 11 purple hearts, 1 special forces tab, 2 ranger tabs, four sets of jump wings, two dive bubbles, four ECB's, six CARs, I'll raise you a revolutionary war Colonel, three Sgt's Major, a Master Gunnery Sgt, a Gunnery Sgt, three Staff Sergeants, and whole bunch of enlisted from the Revolutionary War to Syria. This is a little tid bit on my GGGG Grandfather you probably heard of him: http://warnersregiment.org/Warner Bios.html

Now shut up and sit back down at the little kid's table.
 
The man messed up saying to"...renumber all who have given the ultimate sacrifice to protect our freedom".

You respond with, "What number are you going to give them?"

Yeah, I called you a tool for that. I'd say it to your face if I still lived in Montana. I'm not a chicken sh*t keyboard warrior.

You really don't want to have the penis measuring contest regarding family in the military. I don't have to prove a damn thing to you but if I did, I have a medal count of 2silver stars, 1 distinguished service cross, 13 bronze stars, 11 purple hearts, 1 special forces tab, 2 ranger tabs, four sets of jump wings, two dive bubbles, four ECB's, six CARs, I'll raise you a revolutionary war Colonel, three Sgt's Major, a Master Gunnery Sgt, a Gunnery Sgt, three Staff Sergeants, and whole bunch of enlisted from the Revolutionary War to Syria. This is a little tid bit on my GGGG Grandfather you probably heard of him: http://warnersregiment.org/Warner Bios.html

Now shut up and sit back down at the little kid's table.
I live in MT. Will be at lake this weekend. Let me know when you want to tell me to my face. Assume you will be afraid to show yours. I would be happy to rip you. Let me know if you want to meet my Ranger son, the former head of a sniper unit and door to door guy. You are a big dick. I will give you that. Oh, and my relatives were Crazy Horse and Red Cloud. We go back way before the Revolutionary war. I will see if I can figure out how many scalps of white guys we got.
 
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“He signed no treaties, avoided the ways of the white men, and spurned reservation life. On June 17, 1876, along with more than 1,200 warriors, Crazy Horse helped defeat General George Crook at the Battle of the Rosebud. Eight days later he helped defeat the 7th Cavalry at the Battle of the Little Bighorn.”
 
“He signed no treaties, avoided the ways of the white men, and spurned reservation life. On June 17, 1876, along with more than 1,200 warriors, Crazy Horse helped defeat General George Crook at the Battle of the Rosebud. Eight days later he helped defeat the 7th Cavalry at the Battle of the Little Bighorn.”
Nothing to do with the rest of the argument, but my dad was invited to do some work with the archeologists at Rosebud last year as they searched for some of the bodies that were lost. They had metal detectors, dogs, and a whole operation. Said it was a powerful experience.
 
It took a range fire at The Little Bighorn Battlefield in August 1983 to clear off the overgrowth since 1876. THAT revealed a lot.

"Archaeological Insights into The Custer Battle, An Assessment of the 1984 Field Season, " by Douglas D. Scott and Richard A Fox, Jr., (1987).
 
So you are such a tough guy you are going invite a poster on this site to your lake house so you can rip them rip as you cower behind your son. Sounds about right.
 
So you are such a tough guy you are going invite a poster on this site to your lake house so you can rip them rip as you cower behind your son. Sounds about right.
I'm happy to rip you and the other guy anytime. Mo Club? Let's do it. You two are so brave talking behind a keyboard, to someone you know is a lot older than you. Let's get together. I assume you are afraid to show your face. When do you want to meet up?
 
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