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Historical BS

This is many years ago, but I listened to David Emmons (former Professor in History at the UM) on a lecture in a class on the Civil War and Reconstruction on the economic, political and social rationale used to to defend secession from the Union in the 1860's. He said there was no unifying message then in South and it was just as disparate in ideological grounds as the North was in fighting the war.

There are events that unified those widely divergent thoughts (Turner's Rebellion, Emancipation Proclamation, etc) but it is disingenuous to say the Civil War was fought over (insert your ideological viewpoint). If you read any intelligent history of the Civil War, they recognize the nuance and the complexity of regional dynamics but they don't shirk away from the idea that slavery was central to it all.

That it arrived to a point of conflict, is highly reflective of the inability to find consensus (quoting Shelby Foote) within the political structure of American nation between 1820 and 1860 on a path forward in regards to slavery. The great compromises of the era (Missouri, Compromise of 1850, etc) never truly answered the question, but cured symptoms of the larger problem. Be it the Mason-Dixon line, the Texas/California Question, Kansas/Nebraska, they merely squashed the dampened the fuse and slowed it from reaching the TNT.

There is a tremendous amount re-framing that has gone in recent years, particularly in the form of social revisions, that focus on narratives of larger pictures globally that puts our Civil War in perspective with other nations fights to extend freedoms to certain populations. I tend to agree Eric Foner's (one of the most prominent authors on American History in the modern era) view on perspective on the power of cultural, social and political narratives in past events. No one really owns history and it is constantly being rewritten and it is essential for each new generation to look back and reassess history no matter how uncomfortable that might be. The framework of good historical analysis is never wedded a specific perspective and the best versions ignore it all together and let the scholarship do the talking.

When it comes to racial histories, there isn't a western world country that gets off scot-free and it isn't just an American problem. The winners always got to write the history and all Foner argues is that practice eliminates good historical scholarship and more complete histories. We are aware of more now, in part, because we've stopped having historical conversations that only contain information that makes us feel good. That includes America's complex history with slaves, Native Americans, women, and so forth. Canada, like the United States, are having to answer for the systematic attempts to assimilate large swaths of their native population. The dead bodies in Alberta and Pennsylvania of Native American youth prove that we have a long way to go come to a reckoning over what we did in the past.

Should we feel threatened by a re-examination of past events? No. Should we feel guilty for some of the gross inhumanity executed by our government or our citizens? Possibly. Does that make us lesser people in this moment for having learned about the awfulness or uncomfortable truths? Absolutely not. Perspective is a good thing and a multitude of historical views allow us to understand nuance and complexity in both the past and present. Something that I think we all could use in greater abudance these days.
 
I do NOT feel guilty about history. I wasn't born til after WWII, never owned any damn slaves, didn't benefit one bit from anything these lefty loonies are bitchin' about. Anyone don't like it can kiss my ass. I hope I made myself crystal clear. Crystal!🤬
 
Political friction on the nature of our Republic started well before 1820...the friction was palpable when the Founders debated, drafted, and compromised on the founding documents. Slavery was at the center of the friction.

It remained...to form the Union. If it hadn't the formation would not have happened...
 
I do NOT feel guilty about history. I wasn't born til after WWII, never owned any damn slaves, didn't benefit one bit from anything these lefty loonies are bitchin' about. Anyone don't like it can kiss my ass. I hope I made myself crystal clear. Crystal!🤬
I want reparations from you. Or, get off my land. Ha.
 
I want reparations from you. Or, get off my land. Ha.
🤣No f*cking way, ever. Reparations is leftwing propoganda. Who did your long lost ancestors take it from??? How far back we gonna go? More than likely YOU gonna owe THEM some reparations. Ever thought of THAT? HA!
 
🤣No f*cking way, ever. Reparations is leftwing propoganda. Who did your long lost ancestors take it from??? How far back we gonna go? More than likely YOU gonna owe THEM some reparations. Ever thought of THAT? HA!
My ancestors were the first to inhabit the land in question.
 
😂Only to the extent of current knowledge. Archaeological discoveries keep pushing back the known 'supposed' limits every year. All I'm saying is
blaming anyone currently alive for what occurred long, long ago is total bullsh*t. Playing the 'Brown Card, Red Card, or Black Card' is what it is. Wrong. We are viewing  then with today's eyes, history, and opinions, and saying THEY were so terribly wrong, therefore, the current inhabitants of our society should suffer to make up for what had happened then. So, YOU, a Sioux I presume(or any other defined group) should suffer for what had happened LONG BEFORE YOU WERE EVEN BORN. Makes no sense to me. Your retort? You are more intelligent than to fall for that bullsh*t.
 
From a May 30th article. Many of my relatives were sent to these schools.

"Native American children who were forcibly taken from their families by the US government and placed in Catholic boarding schools were raped or molested by Catholic priests and religious community members for decades, a report revealed Wednesday.

From 1819 to 1969, tens of thousands of children were sent to over 500 boarding schools across the US, the majority being run or funded by the US government, and 80 of these schools were operated by the Catholic Church or its religious affiliates, according to the report.

According to The Post’s analysis and court records, at least 19 Catholic priests, brothers and sisters were accused of sexually abusing 21 Native American children at the St. Paul Mission and Boarding School in Montana, mainly during the 1950s and 1960s.

The investigation revealed that at least 122 priests, sisters and brothers assigned to 22 boarding schools since the 1890s later faced accusations of sexually abusing Native American children under their care. Most of these incidents took place in the 1950s and 1960s and involved more than 1,000 children.”


 
The point my NAS professor made in the 90's about 'reparations' still holds true some 25 years later. He said that if Natives were private citizens and victims of systemic abuse by a private party, they would have had cause 100 years ago and many of the long-standing rights issues upheld. The fact is that wasn't the case and the remedies given to a traditional American citizens haven't been there because of their special status.

Like it or not, the federal government used its role as a 'guardian' of Native populations as a way to legitimize their policies that went from merely paternalist to outright genocidal. That includes all the government contracted education that was not only forced assimilation and inhumane. Almost all of it was signed off by the BIA and either conducted by the federal government itself (Ft. Shaw) or by religious institutions at the Carlisle School and a 1,000 on reservation catholic schools. Much of it occurred not in the 1880's but up to and including WWII. Even after the abuses of these schools were reported and widely known to the federal government, they remained open. Those abuses weren't done just by schools, but the BIA agents themselves. The stories are numerous about the corruption that went on in BIA offices on the Blackfeet, Ft. Peck and Northern Cheyenne Reservations. Federal monetary disbursements siphoned to non-native entities or into the pockets of BIA agents themselves. That is just of the tip of the ice berg and there simply isn't enough time or space to talk about native rights when it comes to law enforcement or the court system.

The outcome is that natives have a million injury claims against the government, and the federal government used its position to deflect its legal and civil responsibility until recently. States, particularly in the west, used Native reservations special status to avoid responsibilities from everything from infrastructure, public safety, and education. Even though states collect property taxes and get federal impact aid, that money if rarely was invested in the way that it was intended on reservations. Much of the most recent litigation has targeted State governments because of the above types of behavior.

It might be one thing to claim injury against a private individual for crimes committed in the 1830's, but if those crimes or injuries are on going and perpetuated by state and federal government agencies and institutions it is a whole other story. So regardless of politics, Natives like Blacks have some legitimate claim for civil liability by state and federal government over policies.
 
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