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IntuitiveGriz

Well-known member
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Go ahead and post anything Griz football related that you'd like to, you know, stuff that doesn't require a whole thread. This way the subject line can't get off course, it'll just be a good, fun place to pop in give info or read info.

Stuff I found out recently that I didn't know, and don't know if most know...if you do, cool.

Zach Vis, 2013 WR signee, was offered a Preferred-Walkon spot at the Univ of Washington, but the Griz offered a partial so we landed Vis! I don't know what his speed is like, but I know he is tall, and he was playmaker in HS.

Mike Ralston, 2013 DE sginee, had a Univ of Wyoming offer, but they dropped the offer and Wyoming coach (a former Griz coach) Pete Kaligis called the Griz and said go get him!

2012 walk-on OL Devon Deitricht was a Griz scout team standout. The coaches said he played so well that they couldn't go out and find a better OL than him, so they gave the scholarship to Deitricht. Nice work, Devon!

Cameron Rokich, Griz 2013 OL signee, is set to GREY SHIRT this year.
 
I would like someone in the know, to explain the differences of red shirt, medical red shirt, grey shirt and all the other ways a kid can miss a year and still have all their eligiblity to play. I don't quite understand it all thank you!
 
reinell30 said:
I would like someone in the know, to explain the differences of red shirt, medical red shirt, grey shirt and all the other ways a kid can miss a year and still have all their eligiblity to play. I don't quite understand it all thank you!

Reinell:

All NCAA football players have what's called a eligibility "clock" which is 5 years to play 4 seasons. That is the key.

Red Shirt- Since a player has 5 years to play 4 seasons, a player can use a year to recover from an injury or he can use it to get stronger and be more ready to play if he wasn't ready as a Frosh for instance.

Medical Red Shirt- This has to be approved by the NCAA. In some cases, the NCAA will approve an extra year of eligibility for medical/ injury reasons. The player must go through a petition process.

Grey Shirt- This is all about delaying a player's eligibility clock from starting. A grey shirt player may enroll at a college on his own and pay his own tuition. He isn't part of the team yet so he can't practice or workout with team. Once he joins the team, his eligibility clock will start. This practice is all about "over signing" recruits. There are many "loopholes" to the NCAA rules and grey shirting is just one example. There is even a new term called "blue shirt" that is being employed by teams. Again, it's all about manipulating the system because there are only a certain amount of scholarships on a yearly basis.

I hope this helps.
 
CV Griz Fan said:
reinell30 said:
I would like someone in the know, to explain the differences of red shirt, medical red shirt, grey shirt and all the other ways a kid can miss a year and still have all their eligiblity to play. I don't quite understand it all thank you!

Reinell:

All NCAA football players have what's called a eligibility "clock" which is 5 years to play 4 seasons. That is the key.

Red Shirt- Since a player has 5 years to play 4 seasons, a player can use a year to recover from an injury or he can use it to get stronger and be more ready to play if he wasn't ready as a Frosh for instance.

Medical Red Shirt- This has to be approved by the NCAA. In some cases, the NCAA will approve an extra year of eligibility for medical/ injury reasons. The player must go through a petition process.

Grey Shirt- This is all about delaying a player's eligibility clock from starting. A grey shirt player may enroll at a college on his own and pay his own tuition. He isn't part of the team yet so he can't practice or workout with team. Once he joins the team, his eligibility clock will start. This practice is all about "over signing" recruits. There are many "loopholes" to the NCAA rules and grey shirting is just one example. There is even a new term called "blue shirt" that is being employed by teams. Again, it's all about manipulating the system because there are only a certain amount of scholarships on a yearly basis.

I hope this helps.

Just a clarification here, typically a "medical redshirt" does not grant an additional year, rather, if the redshirt (non-playing) year has not been used and the player had a season ending injury and has played less that 1/3 of the quarters in the current year (year of injury) then the NCAA may allow that player to use that unused non-playing year as a medical redshirt year and retain the remainder of his eligibility.

Additionally there is a "Medical Hardship" which if a player has lost the majority two or more years of eligibility due to injury then they can apply for an additional year of eligibility under "medical hardship" this is fairly rare but it does happen.
 
I believe a grey shirt can't be a full-time student. That might be something like 8 credits or less. Note that if the 5-year clock starts ticking in the spring of frosh year, the player will be able to have 5 spring balls instead of the normal 4 (in 5 years).

Another way to be able to play 4 years in more than 5 years, is to have a church-related mission (LDS for example) or be in the military, or apply under the same/similar provision like Wilson did.

What's a blue shirt?
 
PlayerRep said:
I believe a grey shirt can't be a full-time student. That might be something like 8 credits or less. Note that if the 5-year clock starts ticking in the spring of frosh year, the player will be able to have 5 spring balls instead of the normal 4 (in 5 years).

Another way to be able to play 4 years in more than 5 years, is to have a church-related mission (LDS for example) or be in the military, or apply under the same/similar provision like Wilson did.

What's a blue shirt?



Also, from http://wahooze.blogspot.com/2012/01/what-is-blueshirt.html

In the world of big-time college football recruiting, we already know what a "redshirt" is (when a player sits out a year but retains that year of eligibility, yet is able to practice / work out with the team.) We also know what a greyshirt is (when a player delays his enrollment at his future college so that his eligibility clock will not start ticking until he arrives on campus during the second semester of the year.) But what the heck is a "blueshirt?"


It's a term I just recently heard bandied about. I didn't know what it meant, so I looked it up. Basically, a blueshirt is a player who arrived on campus as a "preferred" or "recruited" walk-on and then eventually earns a football scholarship.


Interesting concept. We actually have three blueshirt candidates (maybe more) in this year's recruiting class: kicker Dylan Sims, punter James Coleman, and offensive lineman Jackson Matteo.


Propers to Pre-Snap Read for spelling out the system, explaining the history of the practice at New Mexico State (where the term originated), and illuminating the potential problems the NCAA could face with blueshirting. It's a good read, I'd recommend checking it out.
 
grizfan95 said:
PlayerRep said:
I believe a grey shirt can't be a full-time student. That might be something like 8 credits or less. Note that if the 5-year clock starts ticking in the spring of frosh year, the player will be able to have 5 spring balls instead of the normal 4 (in 5 years).

Another way to be able to play 4 years in more than 5 years, is to have a church-related mission (LDS for example) or be in the military, or apply under the same/similar provision like Wilson did.

What's a blue shirt?



Also, from http://wahooze.blogspot.com/2012/01/what-is-blueshirt.html

In the world of big-time college football recruiting, we already know what a "redshirt" is (when a player sits out a year but retains that year of eligibility, yet is able to practice / work out with the team.) We also know what a greyshirt is (when a player delays his enrollment at his future college so that his eligibility clock will not start ticking until he arrives on campus during the second semester of the year.) But what the heck is a "blueshirt?"


It's a term I just recently heard bandied about. I didn't know what it meant, so I looked it up. Basically, a blueshirt is a player who arrived on campus as a "preferred" or "recruited" walk-on and then eventually earns a football scholarship.


Interesting concept. We actually have three blueshirt candidates (maybe more) in this year's recruiting class: kicker Dylan Sims, punter James Coleman, and offensive lineman Jackson Matteo.


Propers to Pre-Snap Read for spelling out the system, explaining the history of the practice at New Mexico State (where the term originated), and illuminating the potential problems the NCAA could face with blueshirting. It's a good read, I'd recommend checking it out.

I have friend that has a son being recruited by Cal Poly SLO as a LB. He is a 3 for 3 player and would be a red shirt Soph at a JC this fall. Cal Poly offered him a "Blue Shirt" option. This kid would enroll in the fall at his own expense, if he played they would offer him a scholarship for spring term. Poly wouldn't take a scholarship hit until then. In theory, the offering school, could get a player that they want ahead of the next recruiting cycle. Kind of like "pre-booking" a scholarship offer. To me, the player has all of the risks in that situation. It is still verbal offer so it's not binding as I understand it. What will these coaches think of next?
 
PlayerRep said:
I believe a grey shirt can't be a full-time student. That might be something like 8 credits or less. Note that if the 5-year clock starts ticking in the spring of frosh year, the player will be able to have 5 spring balls instead of the normal 4 (in 5 years).

Another way to be able to play 4 years in more than 5 years, is to have a church-related mission (LDS for example) or be in the military, or apply under the same/similar provision like Wilson did.

What's a blue shirt?
Swing and a miss again there Chief;

A grey shit delays enrolling until after the season is complete, (Winter Session), this gives him one additional spring practice season before playing if using his first year as a redshirt year and also delays the use of the scholarship for half a year. Often done because the school has no scholarships available during fall session.

A greenshirt is one that enrolls early, having completed HS requirements early the student enrolls in winter session during what would be thought of as his HS senior year, Brock Oswieler(sp) did this
 
Cats2506 said:
PlayerRep said:
I believe a grey shirt can't be a full-time student. That might be something like 8 credits or less. Note that if the 5-year clock starts ticking in the spring of frosh year, the player will be able to have 5 spring balls instead of the normal 4 (in 5 years).

Another way to be able to play 4 years in more than 5 years, is to have a church-related mission (LDS for example) or be in the military, or apply under the same/similar provision like Wilson did.

What's a blue shirt?
Swing and a miss again there Chief;

A grey shit delays enrolling until after the season is complete, (Winter Session), this gives him one additional spring practice season before playing if using his first year as a redshirt year and also delays the use of the scholarship for half a year. Often done because the school has no scholarships available during fall session.

A greenshirt is one that enrolls early, having completed HS requirements early the student enrolls in winter session during what would be thought of as his HS senior year, Brock Oswieler(sp) did this

Nope, I'm right, and your are wrong. Many grey shirts enroll part-time in the fall. See below.

"Here is how grey-shirting works:

A player commits to a team that is over-signed.
That player either doesn't go to school in the fall, or enrolls part-time and pays their own way. They are not officially on the team.

In January of the following year, that player enrolls full-time and officially joins the team. They are technically part of the recruiting class for the following year.

Grey-shirting is a way for schools to skate around the recruiting rules. It allows schools to over-sign, regardless of how many prospects they signed the previous year.

Every player has a five year window to play four seasons. That window starts the second a player is enrolled in college full-time or are on scholarship. Since the player is not enrolled full time and is not on scholarship, their "NCAA clock" has not started.

Once they join a team, they still have the full five year window and the ability to red-shirt if they so choose.

While grey-shirting, players are not on the team.

They can not practice or condition with the team. They can not be given any advantage not extended to the normal student body. Grey-shirts are not allowed at team meetings or functions either. For all intents they are essentially, regular students."

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/117418-college-football-recruiting-for-beginners-part-iii-oversigning-and-greyshirts" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
 
PlayerRep said:
I believe a grey shirt can't be a full-time student. That might be something like 8 credits or less. Note that if the 5-year clock starts ticking in the spring of frosh year, the player will be able to have 5 spring balls instead of the normal 4 (in 5 years).

Another way to be able to play 4 years in more than 5 years, is to have a church-related mission (LDS for example) or be in the military, or apply under the same/similar provision like Wilson did.

What's a blue shirt?

I am not against Mormonism but that BYU mission provision is an unfair advantage IMO. All MWC coaches complained about it.
 
CV Griz Fan said:
PlayerRep said:
I believe a grey shirt can't be a full-time student. That might be something like 8 credits or less. Note that if the 5-year clock starts ticking in the spring of frosh year, the player will be able to have 5 spring balls instead of the normal 4 (in 5 years).

Another way to be able to play 4 years in more than 5 years, is to have a church-related mission (LDS for example) or be in the military, or apply under the same/similar provision like Wilson did.

What's a blue shirt?

I am not against Mormonism but that BYU mission provision is an unfair advantage IMO. All MWC coaches complained about it.

I agree. I'm going to start a goofy religion... like the worship of river Gods and fly fishing or something... and it better count as using the same rules as Mormon kids going on their two year mission. We'll have two year missions too... all over the state of MT to recruit new "Fly fishing God Worship members."
 
CV Griz Fan said:
PlayerRep said:
I believe a grey shirt can't be a full-time student. That might be something like 8 credits or less. Note that if the 5-year clock starts ticking in the spring of frosh year, the player will be able to have 5 spring balls instead of the normal 4 (in 5 years).

Another way to be able to play 4 years in more than 5 years, is to have a church-related mission (LDS for example) or be in the military, or apply under the same/similar provision like Wilson did.

What's a blue shirt?

I am not against Mormonism but that BYU mission provision is an unfair advantage IMO. All MWC coaches complained about it.
Convenient Loophile... :roll: :egriz:
 
PlayerRep said:
Cats2506 said:
PlayerRep said:
I believe a grey shirt can't be a full-time student. That might be something like 8 credits or less. Note that if the 5-year clock starts ticking in the spring of frosh year, the player will be able to have 5 spring balls instead of the normal 4 (in 5 years).

Another way to be able to play 4 years in more than 5 years, is to have a church-related mission (LDS for example) or be in the military, or apply under the same/similar provision like Wilson did.

What's a blue shirt?
Swing and a miss again there Chief;

A grey shit delays enrolling until after the season is complete, (Winter Session), this gives him one additional spring practice season before playing if using his first year as a redshirt year and also delays the use of the scholarship for half a year. Often done because the school has no scholarships available during fall session.

A greenshirt is one that enrolls early, having completed HS requirements early the student enrolls in winter session during what would be thought of as his HS senior year, Brock Oswieler(sp) did this

Nope, I'm right, and your are wrong. Many grey shirts enroll part-time in the fall. See below.

"Here is how grey-shirting works:

A player commits to a team that is over-signed.
That player either doesn't go to school in the fall, or enrolls part-time and pays their own way. They are not officially on the team.

In January of the following year, that player enrolls full-time and officially joins the team. They are technically part of the recruiting class for the following year.

Grey-shirting is a way for schools to skate around the recruiting rules. It allows schools to over-sign, regardless of how many prospects they signed the previous year.

Every player has a five year window to play four seasons. That window starts the second a player is enrolled in college full-time or are on scholarship. Since the player is not enrolled full time and is not on scholarship, their "NCAA clock" has not started.

Once they join a team, they still have the full five year window and the ability to red-shirt if they so choose.

While grey-shirting, players are not on the team.

They can not practice or condition with the team. They can not be given any advantage not extended to the normal student body. Grey-shirts are not allowed at team meetings or functions either. For all intents they are essentially, regular students."

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/117418-college-football-recruiting-for-beginners-part-iii-oversigning-and-greyshirts" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

The statement enlarged above is false, a grey shirt must enroll and take the required credits to be on the team and get scholarship, until they actually enroll full time they are not considered a grey shirt but are considered a recruit. yes a recruit can delay enrollment status by paying their own way and remaining a part time student but your statement did not indicate that.

Greyshirt players are on the team, recruits are not
 
poorgriz said:
CV Griz Fan said:
PlayerRep said:
I believe a grey shirt can't be a full-time student. That might be something like 8 credits or less. Note that if the 5-year clock starts ticking in the spring of frosh year, the player will be able to have 5 spring balls instead of the normal 4 (in 5 years).

Another way to be able to play 4 years in more than 5 years, is to have a church-related mission (LDS for example) or be in the military, or apply under the same/similar provision like Wilson did.

What's a blue shirt?

I am not against Mormonism but that BYU mission provision is an unfair advantage IMO. All MWC coaches complained about it.

I agree. I'm going to start a goofy religion... like the worship of river Gods and fly fishing or something... and it better count as using the same rules as Mormon kids going on their two year mission. We'll have two year missions too... all over the state of MT to recruit new "Fly fishing God Worship members."
So, the church of Norman McLean?
 
Cats2506 said:
PlayerRep said:
Cats2506 said:
PlayerRep said:
I believe a grey shirt can't be a full-time student. That might be something like 8 credits or less. Note that if the 5-year clock starts ticking in the spring of frosh year, the player will be able to have 5 spring balls instead of the normal 4 (in 5 years).

Another way to be able to play 4 years in more than 5 years, is to have a church-related mission (LDS for example) or be in the military, or apply under the same/similar provision like Wilson did.

What's a blue shirt?
Swing and a miss again there Chief;

A grey shit delays enrolling until after the season is complete, (Winter Session), this gives him one additional spring practice season before playing if using his first year as a redshirt year and also delays the use of the scholarship for half a year. Often done because the school has no scholarships available during fall session.

A greenshirt is one that enrolls early, having completed HS requirements early the student enrolls in winter session during what would be thought of as his HS senior year, Brock Oswieler(sp) did this

Nope, I'm right, and your are wrong. Many grey shirts enroll part-time in the fall. See below.

"Here is how grey-shirting works:

A player commits to a team that is over-signed.
That player either doesn't go to school in the fall, or enrolls part-time and pays their own way. They are not officially on the team.

In January of the following year, that player enrolls full-time and officially joins the team. They are technically part of the recruiting class for the following year.

Grey-shirting is a way for schools to skate around the recruiting rules. It allows schools to over-sign, regardless of how many prospects they signed the previous year.

Every player has a five year window to play four seasons. That window starts the second a player is enrolled in college full-time or are on scholarship. Since the player is not enrolled full time and is not on scholarship, their "NCAA clock" has not started.

Once they join a team, they still have the full five year window and the ability to red-shirt if they so choose.

While grey-shirting, players are not on the team.

They can not practice or condition with the team. They can not be given any advantage not extended to the normal student body. Grey-shirts are not allowed at team meetings or functions either. For all intents they are essentially, regular students."

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/117418-college-football-recruiting-for-beginners-part-iii-oversigning-and-greyshirts" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

The statement enlarged above is false, a grey shirt must enroll and take the required credits to be on the team and get scholarship, until they actually enroll full time they are not considered a grey shirt but are considered a recruit. yes a recruit can delay enrollment status by paying their own way and remaining a part time student but your statement did not indicate that.

Greyshirt players are on the team, recruits are not

I believe PR is more correct in this instance. Many grey shirts do enroll part time. They are not on the team yet so their "clock" is not ticking. Since they are not on the team, grey shirts can take units as they wish. Once the the player is on the roster, their clock starts and they're subject to NCAA guidelines. Remember, the term is used to describe a "delayed" eligibility clock situation. Since the grey shirt is on campus and enrolled, how can he be still considered a recruit? Maybe it's "hair splitting" but that's how I interpret the wording.
 
OK, thanks all. Everything is as clear as mud!
Red shirt
Med redshirt
Grey shirt
BLUE SHIRT?
GREEN SHIRT?

WTF?

CV GRIZ FAN had me understanding but now? I'm right back where I started, still confused...

What was Jimmy Wison's eligibility? I mean, what kind/color of shirt fit his issue
 
reinell30 said:
OK, thanks all. Everything is as clear as mud!
Red shirt
Med redshirt
Grey shirt
BLUE SHIRT?
GREEN SHIRT?

WTF?

CV GRIZ FAN had me understanding but now? I'm right back where I started, still confused...

What was Jimmy Wison's eligibility? I mean, what kind/color of shirt fit his issue

bright orange shirt :thumb:

or maybe black and white stripes :lol:
 
CV Griz Fan said:
Cats2506 said:
PlayerRep said:
Cats2506 said:
Swing and a miss again there Chief;

A grey shit delays enrolling until after the season is complete, (Winter Session), this gives him one additional spring practice season before playing if using his first year as a redshirt year and also delays the use of the scholarship for half a year. Often done because the school has no scholarships available during fall session.

A greenshirt is one that enrolls early, having completed HS requirements early the student enrolls in winter session during what would be thought of as his HS senior year, Brock Oswieler(sp) did this

Nope, I'm right, and your are wrong. Many grey shirts enroll part-time in the fall. See below.

"Here is how grey-shirting works:

A player commits to a team that is over-signed.
That player either doesn't go to school in the fall, or enrolls part-time and pays their own way. They are not officially on the team.

In January of the following year, that player enrolls full-time and officially joins the team. They are technically part of the recruiting class for the following year.

Grey-shirting is a way for schools to skate around the recruiting rules. It allows schools to over-sign, regardless of how many prospects they signed the previous year.

Every player has a five year window to play four seasons. That window starts the second a player is enrolled in college full-time or are on scholarship. Since the player is not enrolled full time and is not on scholarship, their "NCAA clock" has not started.

Once they join a team, they still have the full five year window and the ability to red-shirt if they so choose.

While grey-shirting, players are not on the team.

They can not practice or condition with the team. They can not be given any advantage not extended to the normal student body. Grey-shirts are not allowed at team meetings or functions either. For all intents they are essentially, regular students."

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/117418-college-football-recruiting-for-beginners-part-iii-oversigning-and-greyshirts" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

The statement enlarged above is false, a grey shirt must enroll and take the required credits to be on the team and get scholarship, until they actually enroll full time they are not considered a grey shirt but are considered a recruit. yes a recruit can delay enrollment status by paying their own way and remaining a part time student but your statement did not indicate that.

Greyshirt players are on the team, recruits are not

I believe PR is more correct in this instance. Many grey shirts do enroll part time. They are not on the team yet so their "clock" is not ticking. Since they are not on the team, grey shirts can take units as they wish. Once the the player is on the roster, their clock starts and they're subject to NCAA guidelines. Remember, the term is used to describe a "delayed" eligibility clock situation. Since the grey shirt is on campus and enrolled, how can he be still considered a recruit? Maybe it's "hair splitting" but that's how I interpret the wording.

so anyone enrolled as a part time student could claim that he is a greyshirt, that is what you and pr are saying.

a player does not get greyshirt (or any athletic status) until they are enrolled as full time students. How could someone not a member of the team be given any status.
 

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